Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis. It can affect any joint in the body.  It occurs when the protective cartilage that cushions the joints deteriorates over time.  This may be a result of trauma, excessive load and misalignment.

Osteoarthritis generally presents with pain, stiffness, swelling and tenderness around the joint.  Unfortunately, the damage to the joint is irreversible.  However, it is rare that conservative treatments targeting joint stability and pain management do not achieve a reduction in the arthritic pain.

As osteoarthritis can affect activities of daily living and have a negative impact on an individual’s quality of life, biomechanical treatments can form the basis of pain relief, a return to activity and potentially slow the degenerative process.  Podiatry is an integral part of the multidisciplinary approach when managing osteoarthritis in the feet. 

Rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a painful autoimmune condition that generally affects the smaller joints in the body, particularly the hands and feet.  The symptoms generally include pain and swelling in the joints. 

Rheumatoid arthritis will primarily be managed by your general practitioner and rheumatology specialist; however, podiatry plays a key role as part of a multidisciplinary approach.  In chronic cases RA can cause joint destruction and changes in alignment.  Managing bony protrusions and painful nodules are an integral part of the management of a client with rheumatoid arthritis.  When RA affects the feet, joint protection, offloading and better alignment can be achieved with the manufacture of an accommodative orthotic.  At Complete Feet Podiatry we have multiple different types of orthotics and densities; from firm and supportive orthotics to soft and cushioned devices depending on your needs.

Juvenile arthritis

Juvenile Arthritis often has similar symptoms to other biomechanical problems and it can be easily missed.  So, it is important to have it properly diagnosed by the Podiatrist who will then work with the general practitioner and specialist in treatment programmes.